1470-1480 early verdugado (farthingale) by Pedro García de Benabarre - St John Retable Detail

Previous

From the 1470s, this is the earliest image of a farthingale. This image is an excerpt from Pedro Garcia de Benabarre's The Banquet of Herod.

This is an important image from the viewpoint of fashion history because it is an early example of making a skirt fuller by using mechanical supports. According to Wikipedia, "The Spanish farthingale was a hoop skirt. Originally stiffened with the subtropical giant reed, later designs were stiffened with osiers (willow cuttings), rope, or (from about 1580) whalebone. The name comes from Spanish verdugo 'green wood', because the dying stems of giant reed are rigid." A variety of supports have been used and, with plastic hoops for full-skirted evening gowns, supports remain in use today. However, the ultimate skirt support came in the 1850s with the availability of strong yet light steel - the cage crinoline.

The farthingale was devised in Spain around 1470 and remained in general use until around 1620 (later in Spain and Portugal), the date at which this collection of images ends.

This is an important image from the viewpoint of fashion history because it is an early example of making a skirt fuller by using mechanical supports, a verdugado or farthingale. The skirts here are supported by (probably) iron bands. All sorts of supports were used as time continued and, with plastic hoops for full-skirted evening gowns, remain in use today. Advances in materials are very important - much lighter weight steel bands were used when the farthingale came back in the mid-1850s as the cage crinoline. The farthingale remained in use until around 1620 or so.

The woman in red wears a laced bodice while the woman to the right has trimming about her neckline, a bertha, and a ponytail wrapped in net.

Keywords:  1470, García de Benabarre, long straight coiffure, headdress, farthingale, verdugado, square neckline, scoop neckline, bertha, headdress, laced bodice, slashed sleeves, long close sleeves


This site is for educational and information use. It is open for downloading and use without charge. I only ask that these images not be used for profit! I can be contacted at:  contactme@gogmsite.net.